Aleksandra Todorova – ScribbleLive http://www.scribblelive.com ScribbleLive is the leading end-to-end platform for content marketing engagement. Thu, 11 Aug 2016 19:37:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://s3.amazonaws.com/scribblelive-com-prod/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/favicon-91x80.png Aleksandra Todorova – ScribbleLive http://www.scribblelive.com 32 32 What’s In a Pumpkin Pie? These Pumpkin Pie Charts Tell All http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/11/07/pumpkin-pie-charts-2/ Thu, 07 Nov 2013 19:00:50 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/11/07/pumpkin-pie-charts-2/ It’s become a tradition here at Visually to carve a pumpkin for Halloween — and then turn it into pie. Last year’s pumpkin bore our company logo — and before we cooked it up into delicious pies, made entirely from scratch, we made sure to visualize all ingredients. We called Read more...

The post What’s In a Pumpkin Pie? These Pumpkin Pie Charts Tell All appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
It’s become a tradition here at Visually to carve a pumpkin for Halloween — and then turn it into pie. Last year’s pumpkin bore our company logo — and before we cooked it up into delicious pies, made entirely from scratch, we made sure to visualize all ingredients. We called them pumpkin pie charts. This year, we wanted to take things a step further. We started with carving into our pumpkin an actual graphic visualizing pumpkin cost per pound over the past three years. Pumpkinfographic, anyone?
Pumpkinfographic
by amccartney. Next up: turning the pumpkinfographic into pies. We used the exact same recipes as last year for both the crust and the filling. We doubled the ingredients for the filling, planning to make two pies, but – likely because the single-use pie plates we used this year were 1/4 of an inch smaller in circumference than the reusable glass plates used last year? – we ended up with just enough filling for three pies. (Notice the slightly lumpy appearance of the filling… the Visually pumpkin this year had a spaghetti-squash-like, stringy texture, not the puree we are used to getting from sugar pumpkins. FYI: for pumpkin pie, small, sugar pumpkins are best!) But once the pies found themselves in the Visually office, it became clear we might have trouble keeping them whole while we crunched some numbers to visualize! So what did we want to visualize? Why, the pumpkin pies themselves! We carefully entered each ingredient’s nutritional information in a spreadsheet (calories, and grams of fat, carbs and protein), then added up the numbers and calculated their respective percentages. Our data looked like this: And the end result: three pumpkin pie charts visualizing nutritional mass, percentage of calories from each ingredient, and taste:
Pumpkin Pie Charts
by visually. Indeed: in a pumpkin pie, only 3% of the calories come from the pumpkin. And that doesn’t even include the whipped cream. Happy pumpkin pie season!

The post What’s In a Pumpkin Pie? These Pumpkin Pie Charts Tell All appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]> You Don’t Need Complex Charts to Tell Powerful Stories http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/10/11/you-dont-need-complex-charts-to-tell-powerful-stories/ Fri, 11 Oct 2013 22:21:57 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/10/11/you-dont-need-complex-charts-to-tell-powerful-stories/ One common misconception about creating infographics is that more is better. The more data, the better! The more eye-popping design, the better! Make those charts as complex as can be, turn that bar chart into a circle to make it more interesting… or just come up with a whole new Read more...

The post You Don’t Need Complex Charts to Tell Powerful Stories appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
One common misconception about creating infographics is that more is better. The more data, the better! The more eye-popping design, the better! Make those charts as complex as can be, turn that bar chart into a circle to make it more interesting… or just come up with a whole new type of chart that no one understands. It doesn’t have to be this way. If your data tells a good story, sometimes all you need is a simple chart – one single chart – to tell it. No need to add more facts and figures, simply to expand on the argument — or to garnish everything with flashy images and eye-popping illustrations. The graphic below illustrates this perfectly. Designed by Visually Creative Director Jared Fanning, it compares the racial demographics of America’s three most popular professional sports leagues – the NFL, MLB and NBA – to the overall racial composition of our country. U.S. demographics data comes from the Census Bureau and sports demographics, from the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida’s College of Business Administration. The data itself offered an interesting insight into the world of professional sports — and the best way to communicate it was with the simplicity and straightforwardness of a single stacked horizontal bar chart:
Racial Diversity in Professional Sports
by Jared.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

  Baseball, it turns out, is truly an all-American sport. Well, at least as far as racial composition goes. Have you created or come across simple, yet effective graphics that tell powerful stories recently? Send us your work and we’ll feature the best examples here, on the Visual.ly blog. Aleks Todorova is the Editorial Director at Visual.ly. Follow her on Twitter to chat about data visualization, infographics and, occasionally, sports.

The post You Don’t Need Complex Charts to Tell Powerful Stories appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
How to Start Running http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/17/how-to-start-running/ Tue, 17 Sep 2013 17:00:14 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/17/how-to-start-running/ Want to start running — for fitness, weight loss, endorphins, or any other reason — but don’t know if you can do it right? Let’s make one thing clear first: You do not need to read books, watch videos, go through manuals, enlist the help of a coach or look Read more...

The post How to Start Running appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Want to start running — for fitness, weight loss, endorphins, or any other reason — but don’t know if you can do it right? Let’s make one thing clear first: You do not need to read books, watch videos, go through manuals, enlist the help of a coach or look at infographics about running to get started. Like the infographic we’re about to share points out, “What you have to do is this: Abandon all reason and do it now.” [All copy for the graphic is credited to Runner’s World magazine, specifically this article.] Some may argue that what you’re about to see isn’t technically an “infographic.” There are no charts or illustrations, there is no data. There is just a stock image and strategically placed information teaching you proper running form. In its simplicity and straightforwardness, though, this “infographic-light” is the perfect way to get the message across. Sure, you could read articles or books to get more details, watch videos or train with world-class coaches. If you really get into it after a run or two, you probably should. But to get started, this simple image (click to enlarge it) will teach you the very basics. Spend a few minutes studying it and then, as the authors say, abandon all reason go for a run!
Newbie: How to Start Running
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

  Aleks Todorova is the Editorial Director at Visual.ly. She tweets about data journalism, data visualization, infographics and running at @Aleks_Todorova.

The post How to Start Running appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
With an Irreverent Look at the World, Mapping Stereotypes http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/13/for-an-irreverent-look-at-the-world-mapping-stereotypes/ Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:00:46 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/13/for-an-irreverent-look-at-the-world-mapping-stereotypes/ You may have seen this image appear in your Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter or other social media streams — or similar ones, mapping Europe, Northern America and the World in a funny, uncensored manner. They’re all part of a popular series of maps designed by Yanko Tsvetkov, a freelance graphic designer Read more...

The post With an Irreverent Look at the World, Mapping Stereotypes appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Image from Atlas of Prejudice, Vol. 1, by Yanko Tsvetkov. For prints: http://alphadesigner.com/art-store/usa-according-to-common-sense-print/
You may have seen this image appear in your Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter or other social media streams — or similar ones, mapping Europe, Northern America and the World in a funny, uncensored manner.
Image from Atlas of Prejudice, Vol. 1, by Yanko Tsvetkov. For prints: http://alphadesigner.com/art-store/world-according-to-usa-print/
They’re all part of a popular series of maps designed by Yanko Tsvetkov, a freelance graphic designer who was born in Bulgaria, lives in Spain, writes in English and goes by the moniker Alpha Designer, chosen because “it makes people think what I do is really important.” And so it is. Maps are among the most common visualizations we use in real life, yet how often do they make us laugh, rather than simply inform? Poke fun at social and national stereotypes rather than display national borders?

Call it Satirical Visualization

Tsvetkov designed the first map, Europe in January, back in 2009, inspired by the genuine concern of friends who had heard of the natural gas crisis that dominated the news for a while that winter — caused by a pricing dispute between Russia and Ukraine — but didn’t quite understand what it was and what it meant for the rest of Europe. See how long and boring that paragraph was to read? Likewise, Tsvetkov knew that a regular explanation of regional politics and historical references would make for a conversation doomed to blank stares and empty nods, at best. So he sat down and, without much thought about process, tools and documentation, whipped up a map and uploaded it to Flickr.

Image from Atlas of Prejudice, Vol.1, by Yanko Tsvetkov. For prints: http://alphadesigner.com/art-store/europe-in-2009-print/
“I had no idea it would become something significant, so there weren’t any sketches, drafts or notes,” he told Visually. “I just got the idea, opened Adobe Illustrator and I typed in the labels on my template. … If I had the slightest idea about what was coming, I would have spent much more time on it to make sure I have a story to tell. I envy illustrators who are capable to plan their projects in such a way but I am messy by nature and my workflow isn’t pretty.” He might just be too humble (by one stereotype, just so you know, Bulgarians are notoriously lacking in self-promotion skills). Soon, he was making more maps, and they went viral. Really, how wouldn’t they? They were politically incorrect; downright offensive, and irreverently hilarious. Some, perhaps more than others:
Image from Atlas of Prejudice, Vol. 1, by Yanko Tsvetkov. Prints available at http://alphadesigner.com/art-store/europe-according-to-silvio-berlusconi-print/

An Atlas of Prejudice

The entire map collection unsurprisingly found itself on the book market, first published in Germany and, recently, in the United States as well. Atlas of Prejudice is available in English, German and Russian, and sequel is on the way. The maps are grouped into categories, each prefaced by an entertaining essay or story by the author. A quick peek: We asked Tsvetkov some questions about the book, his inspiration, process and plans for the future, among other things. Here’s what he told us: Visually: Where do you find inspiration for what type of map to make next? Yanko Tsvetkov: Everywhere. News, books, media reports… National stereotypes surround us all, especially those of us who live abroad. There’s not a day in which I am not reminded about them. I live in Spain, my partner is Venezuelan. In a 100-meter radius around our house we have Argentinian, Bolivian, Pakistani and Chinese stores. On Sundays the only ones who work are the Chinese. On a major religious holiday everything is closed, except the Pakistani. We have a saying here: “Thank God for Islam or we would be starving!” You always end up joking because you see so many different lifestyles. It opens you up. When working on or thinking about a map, do you do any research? What is that like? It depends on the country. If it’s a big one like Britain, I rarely have to do any specific research because I have so many personal impressions. As countries get smaller, I have to look here and there. But I try to be sneaky and I avoid asking people directly what they think about a particular country. If I can’t observe people, I do a little bit of historical research. History is an extremely reliable source for excavating national stereotypes. Then come literature, cinema, and all the other arts that deal with storytelling. The hard phase comes after I collect all that information because I have to think about a joke that would describe the things I have encountered. How do you select your color palates? (For example: in Europe According to Great Britain, “Evil Federated Empire of Europe” is pink. Is that irony, or did you just wake up one day and think, “I’ll just make that part pink”?) Oh that sounds great, I wish I could say it’s true! Pink is actually the traditional color of Imperial Britain on most maps from the colonial period. I have no idea who picked it initially but I’ve heard that at that time pink had a very different symbolism than the one we have accepted today. I often try to use colors which are associated to a specific country. For example, on most maps I have seen in my life France is purple or blue, and Germany is brown. But I don’t stick to it as a rule. Russia is traditionally green but in my case is blue. Sometimes, it’s just about what seems “right” at the moment. What is the funniest (or most memorable) piece of hate mail you’ve ever received? Ah, most of it is bland and becomes funny only when it’s juxtaposed with others. There’s the usual “stop singling out my country, you fucking idiot,” in which the name of the country varies depending on the sender. Then there are those who begin with “You stupid American!” According to others I am a Russian who rarely showers. I’m a lot of things to a lot of people, just like Jesus. Do you ever incorporate feedback (or ideas/ inspiration) into future maps? Yes. Obviously I can’t edit maps once they are published but if someone I trust points out a problem and I encounter something similar in a new map, I usually take it into account. What map are you planning on next? There are lot of new maps coming because I am working on the second book from the Atlas of Prejudice series. It will appear in Germany in February 2014 with the help of my fantastic publisher, Knesebeck Verlag. I will expand the European collection with new maps. For example, according to the Netherlands and Serbia. I will also try some new ideas about culinary prejudices and social networks. And last but not least there is a map of the world according to my grandmother. What are you working on now? I’m trying to steal some time for my other projects. I have been working on a deck of cards called Mythos in the last 2 years. Unfortunately, the book often consumes all my energy. Apart from the German and the English version, there’s one in Russian that just came out and I am planning a Spanish and a Bulgarian one. I hope after that I will be able to focus on other things. I would love to write and illustrate a children’s book one day. Atlas of Prejudice: Mapping Stereotypes (Volume 1) is available on Amazon.com. Paperback: 74 pages Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (August 11, 2013) Language: English ISBN-10: 1491297107 ISBN-13: 978-1491297100   Aleks Todorova is the Editorial Director at Visual.ly. She, too, was born and raised in Bulgaria, and can confirm firsthand encountering the “Dracula” stereotype here, on U.S. soil. Follow her on Twitter.

The post With an Irreverent Look at the World, Mapping Stereotypes appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
A Beginner’s Guide to Wine http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/03/a-beginners-guide-to-wine/ Wed, 04 Sep 2013 03:51:32 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/09/03/a-beginners-guide-to-wine/ Whether you’re planning a party for guests you’d like to impress or attending one, choosing the right bottle of wine — to serve or bring to the host — can be a daunting task. The learning curve is steep and, dedicated oenophiles aside, few people have the time, money or Read more...

The post A Beginner’s Guide to Wine appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Whether you’re planning a party for guests you’d like to impress or attending one, choosing the right bottle of wine — to serve or bring to the host — can be a daunting task. The learning curve is steep and, dedicated oenophiles aside, few people have the time, money or even the refined palette to really get to know the many types, aromas, food pairings and serving suggestions for this popular drink. Enter infographics. For those who would like a quick-reference guide to wine basics, WineInvestment.com recently published the infographic below, aptly named A Beginner’s Guide to Wine. It walks you through the basics, like learning to read a wine label: To more intricate details, like the different aromas that you may or may not be able to taste as you drink the wine: And if you don’t know what glasses to use for the different types of wine, that information’s in there, too, right alongside an interesting index of wine coloring: The clean, minimalist design of the infographic makes it not only a useful reference tool, but one you could hang on your kitchen wall, as well. It also shows that “data visualization” can go well beyond traditional charts and still convey useful information. Or maybe wine is just one of those topics that just lends itself to visualization easily.
A Beginner
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

The post A Beginner’s Guide to Wine appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
History, Nostalgia and Travel with Railway Maps of the World http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/08/30/history-data-and-nostalgia-with-railway-maps-of-the-world/ Fri, 30 Aug 2013 17:00:05 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/08/30/history-data-and-nostalgia-with-railway-maps-of-the-world/ When was the last time you sat down with a good book? Not on your Kindle or iPad, but the real thing: good old-fashioned pages (thick and glossy!), colorful images, the smell of paper… At Visually, as much as we love discovering great visualizations and graphic design work online, we Read more...

The post History, Nostalgia and Travel with Railway Maps of the World appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
When was the last time you sat down with a good book? Not on your Kindle or iPad, but the real thing: good old-fashioned pages (thick and glossy!), colorful images, the smell of paper… At Visually, as much as we love discovering great visualizations and graphic design work online, we sometimes just need time away from the super-sized flat screens. We’re lucky to have a great collection of data visualization and design books, and we add more on a regular basis. Here, we offer you a look inside some of our favorites.  

Railway Maps of the World

  Mark Ovenden’s Railway Maps of the World is no simple collection of maps. It’s a time-travel device. Depending on where you live — and your age — you may remember train travel fondly. Not as a way to get from point A to point B, but as an adventure. A way of seeing and experiencing the world around you (and sharing it with a bunch of strangers, who may as well be your best friends by the journey’s end). Railway Maps of the World will take you back to that time, and much, much further, to the very beginning of railway travel. The hand-drawn maps of those days now seem too elaborate to be practical — but who cares? No one was in a hurry to be off the train back then, anyway. Compare that to the rail transit maps of today (transit being the operative word): In the early days of railway travel, railway companies did not advertise their services as a method of transportation. They advertised a means of touring local attractions. Or a unique, mysterious experience:   Once you’ve had your fill of history and nostalgia, you can embark on a world tour of today’s railways:   Enjoy! Railway Maps of the World Hardcover: 144 pages Publisher: Viking Adult (April 28, 2011) Language: English ISBN-10: 0670022659 ISBN-13: 978-0670022656

The post History, Nostalgia and Travel with Railway Maps of the World appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
11 Infographics That Will Help You Improve Your Grammar and Spelling http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/29/grammar-spelling-infographics/ Mon, 29 Apr 2013 17:00:48 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/29/grammar-spelling-infographics/ In the era of texting, instant messaging and grumpy cat memes, proper grammar and spelling seem to have taken a backseat to the need to communicate with finger-busting speed. But while ignoring spelling and grammar rules when texting your friends may be OK (honestly, though: it isn’t), once those pesky Read more...

The post 11 Infographics That Will Help You Improve Your Grammar and Spelling appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
In the era of texting, instant messaging and grumpy cat memes, proper grammar and spelling seem to have taken a backseat to the need to communicate with finger-busting speed. But while ignoring spelling and grammar rules when texting your friends may be OK (honestly, though: it isn’t), once those pesky errors find their way into emails, articles and cover letters, they may cost you a good grade in school, not to mention a job. YKWIM? We hope the 11

We hope the 11 infographics below, all of which focus on either grammar or spelling rules or common mistakes, will be both useful and a fun way to brush up on those skills.

Let’s get started with some Basic Grammar Rules

15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly

The Most Annoying Writing Mistakes

10 Hyphenation Tips

Quotation Marks and Punctuation

Common Rules for Capital Letter Usage

12 Most Misunderstood Words in English

Words You Might Misuse

Verbs and Their Prepositions

14 Mistakes With Prepositions

Apostrophes

Finally, one for fun: Eight Totally Necessary New Punctuation Marks

 

Now that you’ve refreshed your grammar rules it’s time to get writing that ebook! Need some inspiration? Check out our guide on How to Create Compelling Ebooks.

 


Aleks Todorova is the editorial director at Visual.ly. She’s a stickler for proper grammar and spelling, but wishes the Morgan Freemark were real.

The post 11 Infographics That Will Help You Improve Your Grammar and Spelling appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Restaurants Run on Tips http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/10/restaurants-run-on-tips/ Wed, 10 Apr 2013 20:30:14 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/10/restaurants-run-on-tips/ Americans love to eat out. But how do they feel about tipping? The tipping culture in the United States has always been somewhat confusing to foreigners, especially Europeans who are used to paying the bill and perhaps leaving a few cents extra to round it up. But here, wait staff Read more...

The post Restaurants Run on Tips appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Americans love to eat out. But how do they feel about tipping? The tipping culture in the United States has always been somewhat confusing to foreigners, especially Europeans who are used to paying the bill and perhaps leaving a few cents extra to round it up. But here, wait staff at restaurants (along with those working in the kitchen, etc.) earn minimum wages – if not less than that – and it is generally accepted that they must rely on tips to make a living. To gauge America’s opinions on tipping at restaurants, Visually partnered with SurveyMonkey Audience to gather feedback from over 500 U.S. adults. See what they told us in the infographic below. (General information on respondents is available here).

The post Restaurants Run on Tips appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Battle of the Long Distance Races http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/04/marathon-vs-half-marathon/ Thu, 04 Apr 2013 22:31:47 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/04/marathon-vs-half-marathon/ If you’re not a runner, it can be hard to wrap your head around the idea of running 26.2 miles. Words like “crazy” might come to mind when you as much as think about it. But for those who’ve come to love running – whether they just started going ’round Read more...

The post Battle of the Long Distance Races appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
If you’re not a runner, it can be hard to wrap your head around the idea of running 26.2 miles. Words like “crazy” might come to mind when you as much as think about it. But for those who’ve come to love running – whether they just started going ’round the block last month or have been competing in their age groups for years – the marathon distance is the ultimate goal; a bucket list type of thing. A marathon is long enough to challenge you physically and mentally and to test your endurance, spirit and heart, not to mention your love of and commitment to the sport. Do not fool yourself, in training you will cover many, many hundreds of miles. And so it is: when it comes to long distance running, the marathon has all the glory. But in recent years, it isn’t the marathon that’s exploding in popularity among runners — it’s the distance that was once, perhaps deprecatingly, named “half” of a marathon. There is nothing “half” in a half marathon, mind you. To run 13.1 miles is no small feat. But because it is, after all, twice shorter than a marathon and the training is arguably easier and less time consuming, the number of people finishing a half marathon distance has been growing much faster in recent years than those running and finishing the full. Non-profit organization Running USA and Athlinks, an online database for race results, released its latest annual Half Marathon report earlier this week and, together with the same type of data for the marathon (out just a few weeks prior), we created the infographic below to visualize some of the most interesting data.

Aleks Todorova is the Editorial Director at Visual.ly. She recently ran her third marathon and will run her 21st half marathon this Sunday. Follow her on Twitter.

The post Battle of the Long Distance Races appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
Visualizing Our Favorite TV Shows http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/03/visualizing-our-favorite-tv-shows/ Wed, 03 Apr 2013 22:34:45 +0000 http://www.scribblelive.com/blog/2013/04/03/visualizing-our-favorite-tv-shows/ There are infographics for pretty much everything these days. But of all the topics or issues you could tackle, one of the easiest to visualize successfully — both in terms of quality and shareability — are television shows. Why? For one, many TV shows have twisty plots or complicated relationships Read more...

The post Visualizing Our Favorite TV Shows appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>
There are infographics for pretty much everything these days. But of all the topics or issues you could tackle, one of the easiest to visualize successfully — both in terms of quality and shareability — are television shows. Why? For one, many TV shows have twisty plots or complicated relationships that just beg to be laid out in a beautiful design. Since television is visual by its very nature, the visual aspects of those infographics are already there — and in many cases, the fans would appreciate them for that alone. But most importantly, let’s not forget that designers and data visualization professionals are people too — and like most of us, they have their favorite TV shows. When you create an infographic about something you enjoy, love or even obsess about, you will design not only with knowledge, but with heart as well. Here are nine such visualizations.

1. A Graphic Tribute to Game of Thrones

Just in time for the much-anticipated Season 3 premiere, Nigel Evan Dennis brings us this stunning interactive visualization that will tell you pretty much everything you want to know about the show’s characters – without giving away the saucy plot lines (you should watch the show to see those for yourself — and read the books, if you truly want to understand everything that’s going on). Each character is illustrated in a minimalist – but very true to life – design and classified according to their house and faith, and there is an interactive timeline (shown above) for the show’s fans to peruse. (Click on the image below to launch the interactive.)

 

2. The Supernatural Sprawl of True Blood

True Blood began as a love story between a vampire and a human telepath, with a bit of shifter sprinkled in. Then, with each new episode, more supernatural beings came into the mix: werewolves, werepanthers, demons, witches, mediums, ghosts… By Season 5, even the truest of Truebies could have easily lost count. This visualization, aptly named The Supernatural Sprawl of True Blood, breaks down what type of creatures appeared in each single episode during the show’s first five seasons.

 

3.Lostalgic

Santiago Ortiz is one of the data vis community’s most respected professionals. His amazing work includes Pleiades, which visualizes Twitter communities, and the 7 sets Venn Diagram: an interactive visualization of seven colors, mixed to create 128 combinations. But most impressive — particularly to fans of the cult TV show LOST — is his Lostalgic: an interactive visualization of the script of LOST in its entirety; every single character, episode, even word. The visualization has several functionalities, including a matrix of characters (sized based on their lines in a particular episode), a graph that maps out character relationships and even a “reenactment” option that will take you through the script, line by line. There is so much to do and explore here, LOST fans can get lost in this interactive for hours.

4. Walking Dead Zombie Kills

Even those of us who don’t watch the Walking Dead know that this show is about zombies — and killings. The infographic below visualizes zombie kills — very tastefully, too.

5. Vampire Diaries: Surviving Death

The Vampire Diaries has a faithful following, overwhelmingly among the female demographic (especially teenagers and their moms). Luckily, infographic designer Michelle Calderon is a fan and created this visualization in the weeks leading up to the Season 4 premiere (the season is already under way).

 

6. Dexter’s Victims

Watching Dexter isn’t recommended if blood makes you squeamish. The killings are many, the blood is free-flowing. The infographic below, visualizing Dexter’s victims during the show’s first five seasons, should give you a pretty good idea of just how gory things can get:

7. Breaking Bad Periodic Table

“Periodic table” visualizations — other than the one created by Dmitri Mendeleev — are rarely successful and often downright cheesy. Hardly any data other than that in the Periodic Table of the Elements lends itself to a periodic table visualization. That is, unless you’re looking at the Periodic Table of Breaking Bad characters. It’s only fitting!

 

8. Mad Drinkers

What do the men (and women) of Mad Men do? Why, they drink. The Mad Drinkers interactive visualization captures the spirit of the show perfectly:

 

9. Relationships in Gossip Girl

Finally, one just for fun. Remember Gossip Girl? If you never watched that show, here’s how it goes down: not much happens over the course of six seasons, other than every single one of the main characters dating everyone else. The infographic below captures that perfectly, with just the appropriate amount of simplicity:

  Aleks Todorova is the editorial director at Visual.ly. The Vampire Diaries is her favorite TV show – and she is not ashamed to admit it. She is often guilty of talking about it on Twitter, too.

The post Visualizing Our Favorite TV Shows appeared first on ScribbleLive.

]]>